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How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive

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Moog is synonymous with awesome analog sounds, and with good reason! This tutorial shares how to make a flexible analog bass in NI Massive with the character of a funky Moog!

 

Flexible Analog!

Making this analog bass in NI Massive is a testament to how simple it is to program truly customized synths!

We should probably start this one out by pointing out that Moog is not a style or a sound, nor just a brand, but a person who helped to bring about modern music as we know it today. Bob Moog was a source of innovation and inspiration for  countless people all around the world, and his name continues to be associated with new products released every year. So what exactly does it mean to make a ‘Moog-style’ synth? First, it must have a full analog sound. It also needs to use similar tools and techniques that are found in Moog synths. We should be able to accomplish this without any trouble, plus add a couple things to put a modern twist on it. This particular analog bass in NI Massive is flexible, in that we will program a subtle sequence that will kick in after a short delay. This allows us to use this synth across multiple genres and styles of music, showcasing both the funky short note and modulating sustained note potential. So without further ado, let’s jump into this and see how it’s done!

This synth starts with three sawtooth waves as the foundation upon which we will build this analog bass in NI Massive. A Square-Saw I wavetable is loaded into OSC1, with the pitch dropped down to -23.97. Another Square-Saw I wavetable is loaded into OSC2, with the pitch dropped to -12.03. And another Square-Saw I wavetable is loaded into OSC3, with the pitch offset to 0.05. Take notice of the fact that each of these oscillators are routed directly into Filter1.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 1

Moving now to the Filter panels, make sure yours is running in Serial mode, rather than the default Serial mode. You will also want to set the filter panel output to Filter2. Now a Lowpass4 Filter is loaded into Filter1 and a Daft Filter is loaded into Filter2.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 2

A Modulation Envelope is now set up and will be used to control the Cutoff parameters of both Filter1 and Filter2. This will be a key assignment in making this analog bass in NI Massive.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 3
How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 4

The total number of Unison Voices is increased to two on the Voicing tab, and these voices are spread out via the Pitch Cutoff and Pan Position features. This provides a fuller and wider sound. The synth is also set to run in Monophonic mode. This adds quite a bit of character to out analog bass in NI Massive.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 5

Here on the OSC tab, we turn off the Glide effect and set up the Restart Via Gate feature to trigger each of the main oscillators in the perfect positions for this analog bass in NI Massive. Also, while we’re here, we can set up the Vibrato settings to better meet the needs of this particular sound and then dial in the overall amount applied with the Macro1 control.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 6
How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 7

Some Bright Noise and Feedback are added to our analog bass in NI Massive, which helps fill it out and provides additional character.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 8

A sine Shaper insert effect and a Hardclipper insert effect are added to the mix to bring out more crunch and grit in our sound.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 9

Some Chorus and a Dimension Expander are added to thicken the sound some and give it more depth, as well. Designing this analog bass in NI Massive is a task that requires attention to detail. You have probably already noticed that the smallest of changes in some of these settings means the difference between our sound being good or bad. The EQ unit is used to accent some highs and lows, while attenuating some mids.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 10
How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 11
How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 12

Now we are going to set up a simple LFO that will be used to help us apply some sequence automation via a Performer.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 13

And here are the settings for the Performer, which will be assigned to modulate the Amp parameter of all three main oscillators in tandem. This is what allows our analog bass in NI Massive to be both flexible and more dynamic over time. In short bursts this synth will deliver normal notes, while sustained notes will reveal the subtle sequence we just programmed. By controlling the Amp knob of the LFO with an Internal Envelope and the Amp knob of the Performer with the LFO, we achieve a nice delay that make this all possible.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 14
How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 15

Below is a short audio example containing both short and sustained notes to give you a better idea of how it behaves.

How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive Tutorial by OhmLab 16

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Cheers,
OhmLab

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Visit: How to Make a Flexible Moog Style Analog Bass in NI Massive


  • john

    NMSV file please pls :’( … or video :)

    • adsrsounds

      Hey – no need for an NMSV .. follow the instructions and make it!

      • Winston Hulley

        i also cant seem to get the same sound :-(

        • http://ohmlabmusic.com/ OhmLab

          Go through the tutorial again, take your time and click on images to see a larger version to ensure your settings are as close to mine as possible. Pay close attention to the small details, including routing of oscillators > filters, filter output, etc.

  • john

    What do the Macro Control where I put the vibrato do, I move it but it doesnt change anything

    • adsrsounds

      Under the OSC tab – is your vibrato settings. Make sure those are set up to do something!

      • john

        Yep they are set up but they don’t affect the sound. Here is the nmsv: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/23312303/MassivePresets/FlexibleMoogStyleADSR3.nmsv
        Moving the macro that is related to the vibrato knobs of the osc and it doesn’t do anything, so what is it for?… even though, I finally make it sound equal as your example file

        • OhmLab

          The vibrato is working perfectly fine in your patch, it’s just that you cannot really hear the effect over the performer modulation that you have set up. Turn that off and you are good to go!

          • john

            still not understand whats the vibrato for, it doesnt make any effect, What is what I have to turn off and how. the performer? … didnt get it :(

          • http://ohmlabmusic.com/ OhmLab

            The Performer set up in your patch is causing volume modulation, which keeps you from hearing the effect of the Vibrato effect because it is so similar in nature. So the vibrato is working just fine. Try reducing the modulation amount on the 5LFO assignment to the Performer Amp knob. This should reduce the amount of modulation from the Performer and allow you to hear the Vibrato. You really do not need the vibrato for anything beyond the amount shown in the last image in this tutorial though. It’s not as though the vibrato should really be a prominent factor in this bass. Does this all make sense?

  • ryanashton

    Great tutorial. Thank you. :)

  • leo anifowose

    loving the tutorials, starting to make some sense. got the sound to almost match (which is a first), the only question is in the LFO envelope. The AMP knob has some cutoff parameters set on it with AD. I couldn’t figure out what that was and if it was really relevant to the sound.

    • http://ohmlabmusic.com/ OhmLab

      The AD refers to Attack & Decay and is from the Internal Envelope on that LFO tab. Basically this allows you to play a sustained note that has a synced vibrato gently added after a short period of time. This is why I included some short notes and longer sustained notes in the audio demo. Listen to it again and it will probably jump out at you now! ;)

      • leo anifowose

        Got it, loud and clear, was also able to add the AD to the cutoff and now it sounds really fully :)

        • http://ohmlabmusic.com/ OhmLab

          Awesome. Glad you stuck with it and got it all sorted.




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